Xenogenesis: A Lesson in Failing Well

The young filmmakers, riding on the coattails of the Star Wars’ success, convinced their investors they could match that achievement. Xenogenesis, a 12-minute B-movie sci fi short, never quite made it to a feature length. Its director, cast & crew had little to no experience. They were driven by the creativity that comes from ambition and enthusiasm. They dedicated the assiduous around-the-clock passion that only comes with aspiration; working on building futuristic models, sci fi scenes and special effects into the wee hours, only to fall asleep on their set. In spite of all of this effort the project failed miserably, the financial backers bailed, and the picture was scraped.

You would have never known that the inexperienced director at the helm would go on to make some of the greatest modern contributions to the sci fi canon. As I write this piece, James Cameron’s Avatar just picked up nine Oscar nominations (including, best pic & best director). The film has already claimed overall global box office records as it rapidly moves toward surpassing the U.S. domestic record holder Titanic. If Cameron claims it, successfully besting himself, he can conceivably put another ten-year gap between himself and his Hollywood competition. Moreover, Avatar is a technological masterwork, which if just a fraction of the buzz surrounding the affect of its innovation proves true, it will redefine movie going as we know it.

Beyond the lessons imparted by the film, Avatar is a lesson in failing well. If Cameron had thrown in the towel after Xenogenesis was trashed he would have never gone on to write & direct Terminator 1 & 2, Aliens or to redefine film as we know it! Cameron was able to use the footage to land his first industry job, turning what could have a career ending failure into the start of a legacy.

Here it is,  Cameron’s Xenogenesis, you’ll notice early prototypes for some of the Terminator technology:

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